Unlocking Horror: 27 Movies Like Get Out

By Published On: June 1, 2024Last Updated: May 31, 20246889 words34.5 min read

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Movies Like Get Out

In the expansive universe of contemporary cinema, one brilliant star shines brighter than the rest, captivating audiences with its absurdity and flawless craftsmanship. That star is none other than “Get Out.” Jordan Peele’s magnum opus not only revolutionized the horror genre but also prompted viewers to question the very essence of reality, leaving them as disoriented as someone who’s had a few too many slices of pizza.

As we embark on this journey through the mesmerizing realm of social thrillers, we must acknowledge Peele’s groundbreaking role in shaping this cinematic landscape. “Get Out” didn’t just hit the screen; it birthed an entire subgenre where the monsters aren’t lurking in the shadows but are deeply ingrained within societal norms. So, buckle up, dear readers, for an enlightening and whimsical exploration of films akin to the brilliance of “Get Out.”

a seemingly idyllic interracial romance takes a spine-chilling turn as Chris, our unsuspecting hero, ventures into the heart of affluent white suburbia with his girlfriend, Rose. What unfolds is a gripping odyssey through the absurdities of white liberalism, where microaggressions flow as freely as wine at a family reunion, and seemingly innocent tea parties morph into ominous rituals.

As Chris navigates this labyrinth of racial tension, his paranoia skyrockets, leading to a climactic showdown that’s both chilling and uproariously funny. Peele’s mastery lies in crafting a compelling storyline and seamlessly interweaving layers of symbolism and social commentary, resulting in a cinematic experience that oscillates between moments of profound realization and spontaneous laughter.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Nope”

Now, dear readers, prepare for a thrilling journey through a handpicked selection of films that share the DNA of “Get Out.” From the twisted nightmares of “Nope,” Jordan Peele’s highly anticipated upcoming film, to the spine-tingling suspense of “It Follows,” these cinematic gems promise to tickle your funny bone and send shivers down your spine in equal measure.

But fear not, for amidst the darkness lies a glimmer of humor, much like a flickering candle in a haunted mansion. “The Blackening” offers a delectably comedic spin on horror tropes, while “Ready Or Not” serves up a macabre blend of humor amidst familial dysfunction run amok. And let’s not forget the timeless classics like “Rosemary’s Baby” and “Candyman,” which paved the way for Peele’s cinematic masterpiece.

So, buckle up, dear readers, as you anticipate the arrival of “Nope” and immerse yourselves in the thrilling world of social thrillers that keep you on the edge of your seat while provoking thought and laughter in equal measure.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “It Follows”

Now, dear readers, prepare for a thrilling journey through a handpicked selection of films that share the DNA of “Get Out.” From the twisted nightmares of “It Follows,” where a relentless supernatural entity pursues its victims, to the spine-tingling suspense of “Nope,” Jordan Peele’s highly anticipated upcoming film, these cinematic gems promise to tickle your funny bone and send shivers down your spine in equal measure.

But fear not, for amidst the darkness lies a glimmer of humor, much like a flickering candle in a haunted mansion. “The Blackening” offers a delectably comedic spin on horror tropes, while “Ready Or Not” serves up a macabre blend of humor amidst familial dysfunction run amok. And let’s not forget the timeless classics like “Rosemary’s Baby” and “Candyman,” which paved the way for Peele’s cinematic masterpiece.

So, buckle up, dear readers, as you immerse yourselves in the thrilling world of social thrillers that keep you on the edge of your seat while provoking thought and laughter in equal measure.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “The Blackening”

Now, dear readers, prepare for a thrilling journey through a handpicked selection of films that share the DNA of “Get Out.” From the twisted nightmares of “It Follows,” where a relentless supernatural entity pursues its victims, to the spine-tingling suspense of “Nope,” Jordan Peele’s highly anticipated upcoming film, these cinematic gems promise to tickle your funny bone and send shivers down your spine in equal measure.

But fear not, for amidst the darkness lies a glimmer of humor, much like a flickering candle in a haunted mansion. “The Blackening” offers a delectably comedic spin on horror tropes, plunging viewers into a world where a group of friends decides to spend a weekend at a supposedly haunted cabin in the woods, only to encounter hilariously absurd and terrifying situations. With its sharp wit and satirical take on horror conventions, “The Blackening” is a must-watch for fans of Peele’s groundbreaking style.

So, buckle up, dear readers, as you immerse yourselves in the thrilling world of social thrillers that keep you on the edge of your seat while provoking thought and laughter in equal measure.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “The Menu”

In the realm of satirical horror, where the absurd meets the sinister, The Menu serves up a delectable dish of dark comedy and chilling suspense. Directed by a visionary newcomer, this film takes audiences on a culinary journey like no other, where the tantalizing aroma of gourmet cuisine masks a sinister agenda lurking beneath the surface.

Set in an exclusive, avant-garde restaurant that promises an unforgettable dining experience, The Menu follows a group of elite guests who eagerly anticipate indulging in the chef’s finest creations. However, as the evening progresses and the courses become increasingly bizarre, the diners soon realize they’re not just partaking in a culinary adventure but unwittingly embarking on a nightmarish descent into madness.

As tensions simmer and secrets unravel, The Menu delves into themes of privilege, power dynamics, and the lengths to which people will go to satisfy their appetites—both literal and metaphorical. With its sharp wit, biting social commentary, and spine-tingling twists, this film is a delectable treat for fans of Get Out seeking a fresh and flavorful cinematic experience.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Ready Or Not”

In the darkly comedic horror landscape, where family secrets are unearthed amidst blood-soaked chaos, Ready Or Not emerges as a wickedly entertaining gem that keeps audiences on the edge of their seats. Directed by a master of suspense, this film blends elements of horror, comedy, and thriller into a gripping tale of survival against all odds.

At the heart of Ready Or Not is a wedding night like no other, as a young bride is thrust into a deadly game of hide-and-seek with her new in-laws. What begins as an innocent tradition quickly spirals into a night of terror as the family’s twisted rituals and murderous intentions come to light. As the clock ticks down and the stakes escalate, the bride must rely on her wit and resourcefulness to outsmart her relentless pursuers.

With its sharp humor, unexpected twists, and pulse-pounding suspense, Ready Or Not offers a thrilling rollercoaster ride that keeps viewers guessing until the very end. Beneath its macabre exterior lies a biting commentary on class privilege, familial dysfunction, and the lengths to which people will go to protect their legacy. For fans of Get Out craving a cocktail of horror and humor with a side of social satire, Ready Or Not delivers a deliciously wicked brew that leaves a lasting impression.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Us”

In the eerie realm of psychological horror, where doppelgängers lurk in the shadows, and unsettling truths come to light, Us emerges as a chilling masterpiece that delves deep into the darkness of the human psyche. Directed by the visionary Jordan Peele, this film takes audiences on a harrowing journey into the twisted recesses of identity, class, and the primal fear of the unknown.

At its core, Us follows the story of the Wilson family, whose idyllic beach vacation takes a terrifying turn when they encounter their malevolent doppelgängers. What begins as a nightmarish confrontation with their own doubles soon escalates into a battle for survival as the Wilsons are forced to confront the darkest aspects of themselves and the haunting secrets of their past.

With its spine-tingling atmosphere, masterful storytelling, and thought-provoking themes, Us transcends the boundaries of traditional horror to deliver a deeply resonant cinematic experience. Peele’s meticulous attention to detail and skillful direction keep viewers on the edge of their seats, while the film’s rich symbolism and layered narrative invite endless analysis and interpretation.

From its bone-chilling opening sequence to its shocking finale, Us is a tour de force of terror that leaves a lasting impression on audiences long after the credits roll. For fans of Get Out seeking another mind-bending journey into the heart of darkness, Us offers a hauntingly unforgettable exploration of the shadows that dwell within us all.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “American Psycho”

In the realm of psychological thrillers, where reality blurs with delusion and the true nature of humanity is laid bare, American Psycho stands as a chilling testament to the depths of human depravity. Directed by Mary Harron and based on Bret Easton Ellis’s controversial novel, this film offers a disturbing glimpse into the mind of a narcissistic Wall Street executive whose veneer of charm conceals a terrifying darkness.

At its core, American Psycho follows the life of Patrick Bateman, a wealthy investment banker living in Manhattan during the excesses of the 1980s. On the surface, Bateman appears to be the epitome of success: handsome, affluent, and outwardly charming. However, beneath his polished exterior lies a twisted psychopath consumed by violent impulses and a desire for control.

As the film unfolds, viewers are drawn into Bateman’s increasingly surreal world, where his obsession with materialism and status spirals into a frenzy of violence and madness. Through Harron’s skillful direction and Christian Bale’s mesmerizing performance, American Psycho explores themes of identity, consumerism, and the fragility of sanity with a darkly comic edge.

From its iconic business card scene to its shocking acts of brutality, American Psycho captivates audiences with its blend of satire, suspense, and psychological horror. For fans of Get Out seeking another thought-provoking exploration of the human psyche and the horrors that lie beneath society’s facade, American Psycho offers a disturbing yet unforgettable journey into the depths of the human soul.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Rosemary’s Baby”

Few films hold as much sinister allure in the pantheon of psychological horror as Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby. Released in 1968, this chilling masterpiece weaves a tale of paranoia, deception, and supernatural terror that continues to haunt audiences to this day.

Set in the heart of New York City, Rosemary’s Baby follows the story of Rosemary Woodhouse, a young woman who moves into a prestigious yet eerie apartment building with her husband, Guy. As Rosemary becomes increasingly isolated and vulnerable, she finds herself ensnared in a web of dark secrets and malevolent forces that threaten her very sanity.

What sets Rosemary’s Baby apart is its slow-burning tension and atmosphere of creeping dread, expertly crafted by Polanski’s meticulous direction and Mia Farrow’s haunting performance as Rosemary. From the unsettling whispers of her eccentric neighbors to the eerie lullabies that echo through the halls, every moment of the film is imbued with a sense of impending doom.

As Rosemary’s pregnancy progresses, she becomes increasingly convinced that something is terribly wrong, leading to a shocking climax that leaves viewers questioning the nature of reality itself. Rosemary’s Baby is a masterclass in psychological horror, blending elements of supernatural terror with a deeply human story of maternal instinct and existential dread.

For fans of Get Out seeking another journey into the depths of paranoia and psychological torment, Rosemary’s Baby offers a timeless and chilling experience that continues to captivate audiences over half a century after its release.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Candyman” (1992)

Few films in the annals of horror cinema possess the eerie resonance and cultural significance of Candyman. Directed by Bernard Rose and based on a story by Clive Barker, this haunting tale delves into the intersection of urban legend, racial tension, and supernatural horror in the heart of Chicago’s Cabrini-Green housing projects.

Set against a backdrop of urban decay and social inequality, Candyman follows Helen Lyle, a graduate student researching the myth of the Candyman, a hook-handed specter said to appear when his name is invoked five times in front of a mirror. As Helen delves deeper into the legend, she unwittingly summons the vengeful spirit of the Candyman, setting off a chain of terrifying events that blur the lines between reality and nightmare.

What sets Candyman apart is its exploration of race and class dynamics within the horror genre. It confronts viewers with uncomfortable truths about systemic injustice and the legacy of slavery in America. Tony Todd’s iconic portrayal of the titular character is equal parts menacing and tragic, adding layers of complexity to the film’s exploration of myth and memory.

As the Candyman’s influence spreads, Helen finds herself drawn into a nightmarish world of violence and despair, confronting both the supernatural horrors of the past and the real horrors of the present. The film’s atmospheric cinematography and haunting score create a sense of dread that lingers long after the credits roll, cementing Candyman as a timeless classic of horror cinema.

For fans of Get Out seeking another journey into the dark heart of social horror, Candyman offers a chilling and thought-provoking experience that resonates with audiences decades after its release.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Candyman” (2021)

In the realm of contemporary horror, few films have the power to unsettle and provoke thought quite like Candyman (2021). Directed by Nia DaCosta and produced by Jordan Peele, this reimagining of the classic horror tale breathes new life into the chilling legend of the Candyman while delivering a potent commentary on race, gentrification, and the enduring legacy of trauma.

Set in present-day Chicago, the film follows visual artist Anthony McCoy, who becomes fascinated by the myth of the Candyman while exploring the city’s history for inspiration. As Anthony delves deeper into the urban legend, he unwittingly unleashes a wave of violence that threatens to consume him and those around him.

What sets Candyman (2021) apart is its fearless exploration of racial injustice and the ways in which history continues to haunt the present. Through its narrative and visual imagery, the film confronts viewers with uncomfortable truths about the enduring impact of systemic racism and the erasure of Black voices and experiences.

Yahya Abdul-Mateen II delivers a tour-de-force performance as Anthony McCoy, nuanced and intensely capturing the character’s vulnerability and descent into darkness. The film’s striking visuals and atmospheric score create an immersive experience that lingers in the mind long after the credits roll, inviting viewers to confront their own complicity in perpetuating cycles of violence and oppression.

For fans of Get Out seeking another thought-provoking exploration of race and horror, Candyman (2021) offers a gripping and timely cinematic experience that pushes the boundaries of the genre while delivering a powerful social commentary.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Night of the Living Dead”

In the pantheon of horror classics, George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead stands as a towering monument of terror and social commentary. Released in 1968, this seminal film not only redefined the zombie genre but also challenged societal norms and expectations, paving the way for a new era of horror cinema.

Set against the backdrop of a zombie apocalypse, Night of the Living Dead follows a disparate group of survivors who seek refuge in a remote farmhouse. As they struggle to fend off the ravenous undead outside, tensions simmer, and prejudices surface within the group, mirroring the societal divisions and anxieties of the time.

What sets Night of the Living Dead apart is its subversive social commentary, which critiques not only the horrors of the undead but also the horrors of human nature. Romero uses the zombie outbreak as a metaphor for the societal ills of racism, sexism, and class disparity, forcing viewers to confront uncomfortable truths about the human condition.

The film’s black-and-white cinematography and stark, minimalist style add to its sense of dread and unease, while Duane Jones’s groundbreaking portrayal of a Black protagonist challenged racial stereotypes and norms in cinema.

For fans of Get Out seeking another horror film with a potent social message, Night of the Living Dead offers a timeless and thought-provoking experience that continues to resonate with audiences over half a century after its release.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “His House”

In the realm of contemporary horror, His House stands as a haunting and deeply resonant exploration of trauma, displacement, and the horrors of the past. Released in 2020, this chilling film directed by Remi Weekes offers a fresh and innovative take on the genre, blending supernatural scares with profound social commentary.

The story follows Bol and Rial, a Sudanese refugee couple who flee war-torn South Sudan in search of a better life in England. However, their hopes for a fresh start are shattered when they are assigned a decrepit government housing unit haunted by malevolent spirits known as “night witches.”

As Bol and Rial struggle to navigate their new surroundings and grapple with their traumatic past, they confront not only the supernatural entities lurking in the shadows but also the xenophobia and racism they face from their neighbors and the authorities.

What sets His House apart is its deft exploration of the immigrant experience and the psychological toll of displacement. Weekes skillfully weaves together elements of horror and social drama, creating a deeply immersive and emotionally resonant narrative that lingers long after the credits roll.

The film’s standout performances by Sope Dirisu and Wunmi Mosaku as Bol and Rial, respectively, anchor the story with raw emotion and vulnerability, making their characters’ struggles feel palpably real.

For fans of Get Out seeking another horror film that blends scares with thought-provoking social commentary, His House offers a gripping and unforgettable journey into the darkness of the human psyche and the horrors that lurk within.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Atlantics”

In the realm of thought-provoking and atmospheric cinema, Atlantics stands as a mesmerizing and haunting masterpiece that delves into themes of love, loss, and the supernatural. Directed by Mati Diop and released in 2019, this Senegalese film offers a unique blend of romance, mystery, and social commentary that captivates audiences from start to finish.

Set in the vibrant city of Dakar, Senegal, Atlantics follows the story of Ada, a young woman who finds herself at the center of a supernatural mystery after her lover, Souleiman, mysteriously disappears at sea. As Ada grapples with the complexities of her forbidden love and the oppressive societal expectations placed upon her, strange occurrences begin to unfold, blurring the lines between the natural and the supernatural.

What sets Atlantics apart is its richly layered storytelling and immersive atmosphere. Diop masterfully crafts a narrative that seamlessly blends elements of romance, mystery, and social critique, creating a film that resonates on multiple levels. From its stunning cinematography that captures the beauty and chaos of Dakar to its evocative score that heightens the tension and emotion, every aspect of Atlantics contributes to its atmospheric allure.

At its core, Atlantics is a deeply human story that explores themes of longing, displacement, and the search for belonging. Through Ada’s journey, the film examines the complexities of identity and the ways in which societal expectations can shape and constrain individual lives.

For fans of Get Out seeking another cinematic experience that combines supernatural intrigue with thought-provoking social commentary, Atlantics offers a compelling and immersive exploration of love, loss, and the mysteries of the human heart.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Bad Hair”

In the realm of satirical horror with a social edge, Bad Hair stands out as a wickedly entertaining and thought-provoking film that explores themes of identity, beauty standards, and the pressures of conformity. Directed by Justin Simien and released in 2020, this genre-bending tale takes audiences on a hair-raising journey through the cutthroat world of the music industry in the late 1980s.

Set against the backdrop of the vibrant and competitive world of music television, Bad Hair follows the story of Anna Bludso, a young woman striving to make her mark in the entertainment industry. When Anna receives a mysterious weave that promises to transform her career and her life, she quickly discovers that her new hair has a mind of its own and sinister intentions.

What sets Bad Hair apart is its clever blend of horror, humor, and social commentary. Simien deftly uses the horror genre as a vehicle to explore deeper issues surrounding race, gender, and cultural identity, offering a biting critique of societal expectations and the lengths to which individuals will go to fit in and succeed.

At its core, Bad Hair is a cautionary tale about the dangers of conformity and the importance of embracing one’s true self. Through Anna’s journey, the film raises important questions about the pressures faced by women, particularly women of color, to adhere to narrow standards of beauty and success.

With its stylish visuals, sharp wit, and memorable performances, Bad Hair offers a fresh and inventive take on the horror genre that is sure to leave audiences both entertained and enlightened. For fans of Get Out seeking another film that combines horror with incisive social commentary, Bad Hair is a must-watch experience that will leave you laughing, screaming, and thinking long after the credits roll.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Antebellum”

In the landscape of thought-provoking social thrillers, Antebellum emerges as a chilling and impactful film that delves into the horrors of America’s past and present. Released in 2020 and directed by Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz, Antebellum takes viewers on a harrowing journey through time, seamlessly blending elements of historical drama and psychological horror to deliver a powerful cinematic experience.

The film centers around Veronica Henley, a successful author and outspoken advocate for social justice, who finds herself trapped in a nightmarish reality where she is enslaved on a 19th-century plantation. As Veronica struggles to understand her predicament and find a way to escape, the film explores themes of systemic racism, white supremacy, and the enduring legacy of slavery in America.

What sets Antebellum apart is its bold storytelling approach and its unflinching examination of America’s dark history. Through its narrative twists and turns, the film forces viewers to confront uncomfortable truths about race and power, challenging them to reckon with the ongoing impact of slavery on contemporary society.

With its stunning cinematography, haunting score, and standout performances, Antebellum is a visceral and unforgettable cinematic experience that leaves a lasting impression. For fans of Get Out seeking another film that confronts issues of race and social injustice head-on, Antebellum offers a provocative and thought-provoking exploration of America’s troubled past and uncertain future.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Ma”

In the realm of psychological thrillers, Ma stands out as a captivating and unsettling film that keeps viewers on the edge of their seats. Directed by Tate Taylor and released in 2019, Ma delivers a chilling narrative that explores themes of loneliness, trauma, and revenge, making it a compelling choice for fans of Get Out seeking a similarly gripping experience.

The film follows Sue Ann “Ma” Ellington, a lonely middle-aged woman who befriends a group of teenagers and offers them the chance to party in her basement. As the teens become increasingly entangled in Ma’s web of manipulation and control, they soon realize there is more to their new friend than meets the eye.

What sets Ma apart is its exploration of the complexities of human psychology and the lengths to which individuals will go to fulfill their deepest desires. Octavia Spencer delivers a standout performance as Ma, infusing the character with both vulnerability and menace, keeping viewers guessing about her true motivations until the very end.

With its blend of suspense, horror, and dark humor, Ma offers a thrilling and unpredictable ride that will leave audiences on the edge of their seats. For fans of Get Out looking for another film that explores the darker side of human nature, Ma is a must-watch that will keep them guessing until the final credits roll.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Parasite”

In the pantheon of thought-provoking cinema, Parasite stands as a towering masterpiece that captivated audiences worldwide with its biting social commentary and masterful storytelling. Directed by Bong Joon-ho and released in 2019, Parasite offers a gripping narrative that delves into themes of class disparity, social hierarchy, and the inherent flaws of capitalism, making it a compelling choice for fans of Get Out seeking a similarly profound cinematic experience.

The film follows the Kim family, who, through a series of clever schemes, infiltrate the affluent Park household and become entangled in a web of deception and deceit. As the boundaries between the two families blur and tensions reach a boiling point, Parasite delivers a visceral exploration of power dynamics and the lengths people will go to in pursuit of their aspirations.

What sets Parasite apart is its deft blend of genres, seamlessly transitioning from dark comedy to gripping thriller with effortless precision. Bong Joon-ho’s meticulous direction and the ensemble cast’s stellar performances elevate the film to new heights, earning it critical acclaim and numerous accolades, including the historic Academy Award for Best Picture.

With its incisive social commentary and unforgettable storytelling, Parasite offers a cinematic experience that lingers long after the credits roll. For fans of Get Out seeking another film that challenges societal norms and prompts introspection, Parasite is a must-watch that will leave them contemplating its themes for days to come.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “The Stepford Wives” (1975)

In the annals of cinematic history, The Stepford Wives (1975) holds a hallowed place as a pioneering work of psychological horror and social commentary. Directed by Bryan Forbes and based on the novel by Ira Levin, this classic film serves as a chilling exploration of gender roles, conformity, and the dark underbelly of suburban life, making it a compelling choice for fans of Get Out seeking a similarly thought-provoking experience.

Set in the idyllic town of Stepford, Connecticut, the film follows Joanna Eberhart, a newcomer who becomes increasingly suspicious of the town’s seemingly perfect housewives. As Joanna delves deeper into the mystery, she uncovers a sinister conspiracy that challenges her perception of reality and forces her to confront the oppressive forces lurking beneath the facade of suburban bliss.

The Stepford Wives masterfully blends elements of horror, satire, and social commentary to create a riveting narrative that resonates with audiences to this day. Through its exploration of themes such as gender inequality and the erasure of individuality, the film offers a compelling critique of societal norms and the pressure to conform to traditional gender roles.

With its eerie atmosphere, gripping storyline, and memorable performances, The Stepford Wives remains a timeless classic that continues to captivate audiences over four decades since its release. For fans of Get Out seeking another film that explores the dark side of suburban life and challenges societal expectations, The Stepford Wives offers a compelling and unforgettable viewing experience.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Scream” (1996)

When it comes to redefining horror conventions and delivering a meta-commentary on the genre itself, Scream (1996) stands as a seminal masterpiece. Directed by Wes Craven and written by Kevin Williamson, this iconic film injects new life into the slasher genre while simultaneously deconstructing its tropes and conventions. It is a must-watch for fans of Get Out, who appreciate self-aware storytelling and subversive twists.

Set in the fictional town of Woodsboro, California, Scream follows high school student Sidney Prescott as she becomes the target of a masked killer known as Ghostface. As the body count rises and the town descends into chaos, Sidney and her friends must unravel the mystery of Ghostface’s identity before it’s too late.

Scream is renowned for its clever dialogue, meta-references to horror movies, and innovative blend of suspense and humor. By subverting audience expectations and playing with established horror tropes, the film keeps viewers on the edge of their seats while simultaneously providing moments of genuine wit and satire.

With its iconic Ghostface mask, memorable characters, and twist-filled plot, Scream has left an indelible mark on the horror genre and continues to be celebrated as a modern classic. For fans of Get Out seeking another film that challenges conventions and delivers a thrilling, self-aware experience, Scream is the perfect choice—a film that not only pays homage to the horror genre but also subverts it in ingenious ways.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “The Oath”

For those who relish the blend of dark humor and social commentary in Get Out, “The Oath” offers a similarly incisive exploration of contemporary issues within a satirical framework. Written and directed by Ike Barinholtz, who also stars in the film alongside Tiffany Haddish, The Oath presents a dystopian vision of America where political tensions reach a boiling point.

Set in a near-future America, The Oath follows a seemingly ordinary family as they navigate the chaos surrounding a controversial government policy known as the “Patriot’s Oath.” As Thanksgiving approaches, tensions rise, secrets are revealed, and allegiances are tested, culminating in a darkly comedic showdown that questions the limits of loyalty and patriotism.

What sets The Oath apart is its razor-sharp wit and willingness to tackle divisive political issues with irreverence and insight. Through its exaggerated portrayal of a society on the brink of collapse, the film holds up a funhouse mirror to contemporary politics, inviting viewers to reflect on the absurdities of extremism and ideological tribalism.

With its stellar cast, biting humor, and timely subject matter, The Oath serves as a provocative companion piece to Get Out, offering a thought-provoking exploration of societal tensions and the erosion of civil discourse. As both films invite audiences to confront uncomfortable truths through the lens of satire, The Oath stands as a worthy addition to any viewer’s must-watch list.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”

In the realm of thought-provoking films tackling interracial relationships and societal norms, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” stands as a timeless classic that paved the way for narratives like “Get Out.” Directed by Stanley Kramer and released in 1967, this groundbreaking film stars Sidney Poitier, Katharine Hepburn, and Spencer Tracy in a poignant exploration of love, race, and acceptance.

Set during the civil rights movement of the 1960s, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” follows the story of Joanna Drayton, a white woman, who brings her Black fiancé, John Prentice, home to meet her liberal parents. What unfolds is a series of heartfelt conversations, cultural clashes, and, ultimately, a powerful message about the universality of love and the need to challenge ingrained prejudices.

What sets “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” apart is its ability to tackle sensitive topics with grace and nuance. The film addresses issues of race and identity through the lens of a heartfelt family drama. The film’s stellar cast delivers powerful performances that resonate with audiences, sparking conversations about societal expectations and the importance of empathy and understanding.

As a precursor to films like “Get Out,” “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” laid the groundwork for exploring race relations and social dynamics on the big screen. Its enduring relevance and impact serve as a testament to the power of cinema to inspire dialogue and promote social change, making it a must-watch for anyone seeking films that challenge the status quo and provoke thoughtful reflection.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Sorry to Bother You”

In the realm of thought-provoking social commentary and genre-bending storytelling, “Sorry to Bother You” stands out as a captivating and surreal cinematic experience that resonates with the spirit of “Get Out.” Directed by Boots Riley and released in 2018, this film delivers a biting satire on capitalism, race, and corporate culture wrapped in a surreal package that defies traditional narrative conventions.

Set in an alternate present-day Oakland, “Sorry to Bother You” follows the journey of Cassius Green, a struggling black telemarketer who discovers a magical key to success: using his “white voice” to navigate the corporate world. As Cassius climbs the ranks at his telemarketing firm, he becomes entangled in a web of greed, exploitation, and moral compromise, ultimately choosing between financial success and personal integrity.

What sets “Sorry to Bother You” apart is its audacious blend of social commentary and absurdist humor, creating a unique cinematic experience that challenges viewers to question the status quo. The film’s surreal visuals, provocative themes, and stellar performances, particularly by Lakeith Stanfield and Tessa Thompson, push boundaries and defy expectations, much like “Get Out.”

Like “Get Out,” “Sorry to Bother You” uses the language of satire to expose deeper truths about society, offering incisive commentary on issues of race, class, and the commodification of identity. Its bold and unapologetic approach to storytelling invites audiences to confront uncomfortable truths while entertaining them with its unconventional narrative and visual style.

For viewers seeking films that push the boundaries of conventional storytelling and challenge societal norms, “Sorry to Bother You” is a must-watch companion to “Get Out.” Its thought-provoking themes, surreal aesthetic, and biting humor make it a cinematic gem that leaves a lasting impression and sparks meaningful conversations long after the credits roll.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “The Invisible Man”

If you’re craving a spine-tingling experience akin to the gripping tension of “Get Out,” look no further than “The Invisible Man.” Directed by Leigh Whannell and released in 2020, this modern retelling of the classic H.G. Wells novel offers a thrilling exploration of power dynamics, gaslighting, and the horrors of unseen threats.

The film follows Cecilia, a woman who escapes from her abusive and controlling partner, only to be haunted by the eerie presence of an invisible stalker. As Cecilia’s sanity is called into question, she must fight to prove her sanity and uncover the truth behind her tormentor’s invisibility.

Like “Get Out,” “The Invisible Man” masterfully blends elements of horror and psychological thriller, keeping viewers on the edge of their seats with its relentless tension and unexpected twists. Elisabeth Moss delivers a tour de force performance as Cecilia, capturing the character’s vulnerability and resilience in the face of unimaginable terror.

What sets “The Invisible Man” apart is its chilling exploration of the impact of gaslighting and psychological manipulation, themes that resonate deeply in today’s society. Through Cecilia’s harrowing ordeal, the film shines a light on the insidious nature of abuse and the strength required to break free from its grasp.

With its expertly crafted suspense, thought-provoking themes, and powerhouse performances, “The Invisible Man” offers a captivating cinematic experience that will leave audiences breathless. For fans of “Get Out” seeking a similarly gripping tale of psychological horror and societal commentary, “The Invisible Man” is an absolute must-watch.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “Jennifer’s Body”

For those who relish the blend of horror and social commentary found in “Get Out,” “Jennifer’s Body” offers a deliciously dark and satirical take on the genre. Directed by Karyn Kusama and penned by Diablo Cody, this 2009 cult classic stars Megan Fox as Jennifer Check, a high school cheerleader whose life takes a sinister turn after a botched ritual leaves her possessed by a demonic entity.

What sets “Jennifer’s Body” apart is its subversive approach to traditional horror tropes, using them as a backdrop to explore themes of female friendship, sexuality, and the objectification of women in society. As Jennifer’s best friend, Needy, played by Amanda Seyfried, grapples with the horrifying truth of her friend’s newfound appetite for human flesh, the film delves into the complexities of female identity and empowerment.

With its sharp wit, dark humor, and sly commentary on the pressures young women face, “Jennifer’s Body” offers a fresh and provocative take on the horror genre. While it may not be as overtly political as “Get Out,” its underlying themes of societal expectations and the commodification of female bodies make it a compelling companion piece for fans seeking thought-provoking horror with a feminist twist.

From its memorable one-liners to its stylish visuals and killer soundtrack, “Jennifer’s Body” is a film that defies easy categorization, offering a multifaceted exploration of horror, humor, and female empowerment. For those who appreciate the bold storytelling and social relevance of “Get Out,” “Jennifer’s Body” is a wickedly entertaining ride that’s sure to leave a lasting impression.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “The Babadook”

For viewers who crave psychological depth and spine-chilling thrills akin to “Get Out,” “The Babadook” offers a haunting exploration of grief, trauma, and the horrors that lurk within the human psyche. Directed by Jennifer Kent, this 2014 Australian horror film follows Amelia, a single mother struggling to raise her troubled son Samuel following the tragic death of her husband.

What sets “The Babadook” apart is its masterful blend of psychological horror and emotional depth, as the titular character—an ominous figure from a children’s book—manifests as a sinister force that preys upon the family’s deepest fears and anxieties. As Amelia grapples with her own unresolved grief and Samuel’s escalating behavior, the line between reality and nightmare blurs, leading to a climax that is as terrifying as it is cathartic.

With its atmospheric tension, haunting visuals, and powerhouse performances by Essie Davis and Noah Wiseman as Amelia and Samuel, “The Babadook” transcends the conventions of traditional horror to deliver a deeply resonant exploration of trauma and survival. While it may not share “Get Out’s” overt social commentary, its themes of psychological turmoil and the darkness that resides within us all make it a compelling companion piece for fans of thought-provoking horror.

From its chillingly effective scares to its poignant exploration of grief and motherhood, “The Babadook” stands as a modern masterpiece of the horror genre, offering a deeply unsettling yet ultimately cathartic viewing experience. For those who appreciate the psychological complexity and emotional depth of “Get Out,” “The Babadook” is a haunting journey into the darkest corners of the human soul that is not to be missed.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “The Shining”

For those captivated by the psychological intensity and haunting atmosphere of “Get Out,” Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining” offers a chilling descent into madness that continues to terrify audiences decades after its release. Adapted from Stephen King’s novel of the same name, this 1980 horror masterpiece follows Jack Torrance, a writer who takes a job as the winter caretaker of the isolated Overlook Hotel with his family.

What sets “The Shining” apart is its meticulous attention to detail, atmospheric cinematography, and slow-burning tension, all of which contribute to its status as a cinematic tour de force. From the iconic imagery of the eerie hotel corridors to Jack Nicholson’s unforgettable performance as the increasingly unhinged Jack Torrance, every aspect of the film is crafted to instill a sense of dread and unease in the viewer.

As Jack’s sanity unravels and the supernatural forces of the Overlook Hotel exert their influence, “The Shining” delves into themes of isolation, addiction, and the disintegration of the nuclear family. Kubrick’s masterful direction and King’s rich source material combine to create a film that is as intellectually stimulating as it is viscerally terrifying.

While “The Shining” may not directly address the themes of race and social commentary present in “Get Out,” its exploration of psychological horror and the fragility of the human mind makes it a compelling companion piece for fans of thought-provoking cinema. Whether it’s the eerie twins, the blood-soaked elevator, or the haunting refrain of “Redrum,” “The Shining” offers an unforgettable journey into the heart of darkness that is sure to leave a lasting impression on viewers.

Movies Like “Get Out”: “A Quiet Place”

For those drawn to the tense and gripping storytelling of “Get Out,” “A Quiet Place” offers a heart-pounding exploration of survival in a world where silence is paramount. Directed by John Krasinski, who also stars alongside Emily Blunt, this 2018 horror-thriller follows a family living in near-silence to evade mysterious creatures that hunt by sound.

What sets “A Quiet Place” apart is its innovative premise and masterful execution. With minimal dialogue and a focus on visual storytelling, the film immerses viewers in a world where every sound could mean life or death. From the family’s ingenious communication methods to the constant threat of the unseen creatures lurking in the shadows, “A Quiet Place” keeps audiences on the edge of their seats from start to finish.

At its core, “A Quiet Place” is a story about family bonds, sacrifice, and the lengths to which people will go to protect their loved ones. The film’s emotional depth and intense atmosphere make it a captivating experience for viewers seeking a thought-provoking blend of horror and drama.

While “A Quiet Place” may not delve into the same social commentary as “Get Out,” its exploration of fear, survival, and human resilience offers a compelling parallel. Whether it’s the heart-stopping suspense or the poignant moments of familial connection, “A Quiet Place” delivers a cinematic experience that is as emotionally resonant as it is viscerally thrilling.

As we bid farewell to this enchanting voyage through the corridors of cinematic brilliance, let’s not forget the profound lessons learned from “Get Out” and its kin. For within the realm of laughter and terror lies a mirror reflecting our deepest fears and unveiling our darkest truths.

So, dear readers, as you navigate the labyrinthine depths of cinema, remember to approach each film with a discerning yet light-hearted gaze, for therein lies the essence of Peele’s unparalleled genius. And who knows? Perhaps in the not-so-distant future, we’ll find ourselves chuckling at the audacious absurdity of a fictional Peele masterpiece that pushes the boundaries of comedy and horror to new heights.

But until that day arrives, let us revel in the shared joys of laughter and terror, for therein lies the true essence of the human experience.