13 Best Movies Like Hereditary

By Published On: May 16, 2024Last Updated: May 20, 20244054 words20.3 min read

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Movies Like Hereditary

Looking for a bone-chilling experience that lingers long after the credits roll? Dive into the world of horror cinema and explore films akin to the haunting masterpiece “Hereditary.” This genre-defying gem, directed by Ari Aster, captivated audiences with its spine-tingling narrative and emotional complexity, earning it a well-deserved spot among the pantheon of horror classics.

13 Best Movies Like Hereditary

The Lodge (2019)

Explore the chilling depths of “The Lodge,” a haunting thriller that will leave you on the edge of your seat. Directed by Veronika Franz and Severin Fiala, this film offers a gripping narrative intertwined with psychological tension and unexpected twists.

Set in a remote winter cabin, the story unfolds in a rapid, emotionally overwhelming context. Laura Hall (played by Alicia Silverstone) tragically takes her own life upon learning of her ex-husband’s (Richard Armitage) plans to remarry. His new fiancée (Riley Keough), raised in a Christian cult, becomes the target of resentment and fear from his children. As tensions rise and secrets unravel, the stage is set for a chilling battle of wills in the isolated lodge.

“The Lodge” masterfully explores themes of grief, manipulation, and the blurred lines between reality and nightmare. With its atmospheric setting and nuanced performances, it delivers a truly immersive experience that will linger in your mind long after the credits roll. Brace yourself for a psychological rollercoaster that challenges perceptions and leaves audiences questioning the very nature of fear.

Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

Step into the unsettling world of “Rosemary’s Baby,” a timeless horror classic that continues to captivate audiences with its sinister charm. Directed by Roman Polanski, this film weaves a tale of paranoia, manipulation, and supernatural intrigue that has stood the test of time.

The story follows Guy and Rosemary Woodhouse (portrayed by Mia Farrow and John Cassavetes), a young couple who move into a new apartment with dreams of starting a family. However, their seemingly idyllic life takes a dark turn when Rosemary becomes pregnant under suspicious circumstances. As she delves deeper into the mysteries surrounding her pregnancy, she uncovers a web of deception and malevolent forces lurking in the shadows.

“Rosemary’s Baby” is more than just a horror film; it’s a psychological thriller that explores the darkest corners of human nature. Polanski’s masterful direction creates a palpable sense of unease, drawing viewers into a world where nothing is as it seems. With its iconic performances and chilling atmosphere, this film remains a haunting masterpiece that continues to unsettle audiences decades after its release. Brace yourself for a journey into the heart of darkness, where the line between reality and nightmare blurs into oblivion.

The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017)

Prepare to be immersed in the chilling atmosphere of “The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” a contemporary masterpiece that delves into the depths of psychological horror with unnerving precision. Directed by Yorgos Lanthimos, this film offers a haunting exploration of guilt, morality, and the sinister forces that lurk beneath the surface of everyday life.

The story revolves around Steven Murphy (played by Colin Farrell), a renowned cardiovascular surgeon, who befriends a mysterious teenage boy named Martin (portrayed by Barry Keoghan). As their relationship deepens, Steven’s idyllic family life begins to unravel, and he finds himself entangled in a web of secrets and lies that threaten to destroy everything he holds dear.

What sets “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” apart is its relentless tension and palpable sense of dread, which gradually intensifies as the narrative unfolds. Lanthimos’s distinctive directorial style, characterized by deadpan dialogue and eerie cinematography, creates an atmosphere of unease that lingers long after the credits roll.

With its thought-provoking themes and unforgettable performances, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” is a cinematic experience unlike any other. It challenges viewers to confront their deepest fears and darkest impulses, inviting them to ponder the nature of justice and sacrifice in a world where the line between right and wrong is blurred beyond recognition. Brace yourself for a journey into the heart of darkness, where the sins of the past come back to haunt the present in the most terrifying of ways.

It Follows (2014)

Prepare to be captivated by the sleek and stylish horror of “It Follows,” a film that breathes new life into the slasher genre with its innovative premise and evocative storytelling. Directed by David Robert Mitchell, this modern classic offers a fresh take on the age-old trope of a relentless killer, delivering a chilling meditation on the nature of fear and the consequences of desire.

At the heart of the story is Jay Height (portrayed by Maika Monroe), a young woman who finds herself haunted by a malevolent entity after a seemingly innocent sexual encounter. As she grapples with the terror of being pursued by an unseen force that can take on any human form, Jay embarks on a desperate quest to uncover the truth behind her supernatural tormentor.

What sets “It Follows” apart is its atmospheric cinematography and haunting score, which combine to create an atmosphere of creeping dread that permeates every frame. Mitchell’s meticulous attention to detail and masterful use of suspense keep audiences on the edge of their seats, unsure of what horrors lurk just beyond the shadows.

But perhaps the most compelling aspect of “It Follows” is its underlying metaphorical resonance, which explores themes of sexuality, mortality, and the inevitability of death. By transforming the traditional slasher narrative into a deeply allegorical tale, Mitchell invites viewers to confront their deepest fears and anxieties, challenging them to look beyond the surface and confront the darkness that lies within.

With its thought-provoking themes and spine-tingling scares, “It Follows” is a must-watch for horror aficionados and casual moviegoers alike. So, brace yourself for a cinematic experience like no other, where the line between fantasy and reality blurs, and the true meaning of terror is revealed in all its unsettling glory.

It Follows (2014)

Prepare to be captivated by the sleek and stylish horror of “It Follows,” a film that breathes new life into the slasher genre with its innovative premise and evocative storytelling. Directed by David Robert Mitchell, this modern classic offers a fresh take on the age-old trope of a relentless killer, delivering a chilling meditation on the nature of fear and the consequences of desire.

At the heart of the story is Jay Height (portrayed by Maika Monroe), a young woman who finds herself haunted by a malevolent entity after a seemingly innocent sexual encounter. As she grapples with the terror of being pursued by an unseen force that can take on any human form, Jay embarks on a desperate quest to uncover the truth behind her supernatural tormentor.

What sets “It Follows” apart is its atmospheric cinematography and haunting score, which combine to create an atmosphere of creeping dread that permeates every frame. Mitchell’s meticulous attention to detail and masterful use of suspense keep audiences on the edge of their seats, unsure of what horrors lurk just beyond the shadows.

But perhaps the most compelling aspect of “It Follows” is its underlying metaphorical resonance, which explores themes of sexuality, mortality, and the inevitability of death. By transforming the traditional slasher narrative into a deeply allegorical tale, Mitchell invites viewers to confront their deepest fears and anxieties, challenging them to look beyond the surface and confront the darkness that lies within.

With its thought-provoking themes and spine-tingling scares, “It Follows” is a must-watch for horror aficionados and casual moviegoers alike. So, brace yourself for a cinematic experience like no other, where the line between fantasy and reality blurs, and the true meaning of terror is revealed in all its unsettling glory.

The Wailing (2016)

Venture into the heart of darkness with “The Wailing,” a chilling masterpiece that weaves together elements of horror, mystery, and supernatural folklore into a mesmerizing tapestry of terror. Directed by Na Hong-jin, this South Korean film takes audiences on a harrowing journey to a remote village gripped by a malevolent force.

Set in the picturesque yet foreboding landscape of Gokseong, “The Wailing” introduces viewers to a small community plagued by a mysterious outbreak of violence and madness. When a series of gruesome murders rock the village, a bumbling police officer, played by Kwak Do-won, finds himself thrust into a nightmarish investigation that defies explanation.

As the officer delves deeper into the dark secrets of the village, he encounters a sinister Japanese stranger whose arrival coincides with the outbreak. With each revelation, the line between reality and superstition blurs, and the true nature of the evil lurking in the shadows becomes increasingly elusive.

What sets “The Wailing” apart is its masterful blend of supernatural horror with deeply human themes. Through its intricate plot and richly drawn characters, the film explores complex issues of faith, morality, and the nature of evil, leaving audiences questioning the very fabric of reality.

But it’s the film’s atmosphere of palpable dread and unease that truly sets it apart. From its haunting cinematography to its spine-tingling sound design, “The Wailing” creates an atmosphere of pervasive terror that lingers long after the credits roll, leaving viewers haunted by its enigmatic mysteries.

With its mesmerizing storytelling and relentless suspense, “The Wailing” stands as a testament to the power of cinema to terrify and captivate in equal measure. So, prepare to be drawn into a world of ancient evils and supernatural horrors, where the line between good and evil is blurred, and the true terror lies in the unknown.

The Babadook (2014)

Prepare to confront your deepest fears with “The Babadook,” a haunting exploration of grief, trauma, and the darkness that resides within us all. Directed by Australian filmmaker Jennifer Kent, this critically acclaimed horror film takes audiences on a psychological journey into the depths of the human psyche.

At its core, “The Babadook” is a story of a mother’s struggle to cope with the loss of her husband and the burden of raising her troubled young son, portrayed with haunting realism by Essie Davis and Noah Wiseman, respectively. As they grapple with their shared grief, their already strained relationship is pushed to the brink by the arrival of a sinister presence in their home.

The titular Babadook, a malevolent entity from a mysterious children’s book, manifests as a physical manifestation of the family’s trauma and grief, tormenting them with its terrifying presence. As the mother and son confront the horrors of their past, they must confront their own inner demons and find the strength to confront the darkness that threatens to consume them.

What sets “The Babadook” apart is its profound exploration of the psychological toll of grief and trauma. Through its chilling imagery and visceral performances, the film taps into universal fears of loss, isolation, and the fear of losing control. It’s a film that resonates on a deeply emotional level, leaving a lasting impression on viewers long after the credits roll.

But beyond its scares, “The Babadook” is also a testament to the resilience of the human spirit. It’s a story of survival, of finding the courage to confront our darkest fears and emerge stronger on the other side. In the end, it’s a reminder that sometimes the most terrifying monsters are the ones that dwell within ourselves. So, prepare to be captivated by the psychological horror of “The Babadook” and confront the darkness that lurks within us all.

The Other (1972)

Step into the eerie and enigmatic world of “The Other,” a chilling psychological thriller that will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very end. Directed by Robert Mulligan, known for his work on classics like “To Kill a Mockingbird,” this atmospheric masterpiece delivers a haunting exploration of childhood innocence and the darkness that lurks beneath the surface.

Set against the backdrop of a picturesque farm, “The Other” follows the story of two young identical twins, Niles and Holland, played with haunting intensity by Chris and Martin Udvarnoky. Still reeling from the tragic loss of their father, the boys navigate the complexities of grief and growing up under the watchful eye of their protective grandmother and mentally unstable mother.

As the twins immerse themselves in a world of imagination and make-believe, they become increasingly drawn to a series of mysterious and macabre occurrences on the farm. From sinister secrets hidden in the apple cellar to inexplicable accidents and tragedies, the boys find themselves caught in a web of deception and dread.

What sets “The Other” apart is its masterful blend of psychological tension and supernatural intrigue. Mulligan crafts a palpable sense of unease, slowly unraveling the mysteries of the farm and the true nature of the twins’ relationship. With its atmospheric cinematography and haunting score, the film builds to a chilling climax that will leave you questioning everything you thought you knew.

But beyond its scares, “The Other” is also a poignant exploration of family dynamics and the bond between siblings. As the twins grapple with the darkness within themselves and the secrets that threaten to tear them apart, they must confront their own inner demons and the terrifying truth about their family’s past.

In the end, “The Other” is a chilling reminder that sometimes the greatest horrors are the ones that come from within. So, brace yourself for a journey into the heart of darkness with this haunting masterpiece, and prepare to confront the other side of fear.

Frailty (2001)

Dive into the gripping and psychologically intense world of “Frailty,” a chilling thriller that blurs the lines between faith, family, and fanaticism. Directed by and starring the late Bill Paxton, this haunting film delivers a thought-provoking exploration of the nature of good and evil, leaving audiences questioning their own beliefs long after the credits roll.

Set in the 1970s, “Frailty” follows the story of the Meiks family, led by the deeply religious and enigmatic father, played by Paxton. When the father begins to experience visions from God instructing him to rid the world of demons disguised as ordinary people, he enlists the help of his two young sons, Fenton and Adam, in carrying out his divine mission.

As the father embarks on a crusade of violence and murder, dragging his sons into a world of darkness and despair, the lines between righteousness and madness begin to blur. Fenton, the eldest son, becomes increasingly skeptical of his father’s supposed divine mission, while Adam, the younger and more impressionable of the two, blindly follows his father’s lead.

What sets “Frailty” apart is its exploration of moral ambiguity and the power of faith to justify even the most heinous acts. Paxton delivers a tour-de-force performance as the conflicted father torn between his duty to God and the love for his family, while Matthew McConaughey shines as Fenton, the tortured son struggling to reconcile his father’s actions with his own sense of morality.

But beyond its chilling premise and powerhouse performances, “Frailty” is ultimately a story about the bond between father and sons and the lengths to which one man will go to protect his family, even at the cost of his own soul. As the film builds to its shocking and gut-wrenching conclusion, audiences are left to ponder the true nature of good and evil and the thin line that separates them.

In the end, “Frailty” is a haunting and thought-provoking thriller that challenges audiences to confront their own beliefs about faith, family, and the nature of evil. So, buckle up for a rollercoaster ride of suspense and terror, and prepare to question everything you thought you knew about the battle between light and darkness.

The Machinist (2004)

Prepare to delve into the eerie and psychologically riveting world of “The Machinist,” a gripping thriller that will leave you questioning reality long after the credits roll. Directed by Brad Anderson and featuring a transformative performance by Christian Bale, this haunting film takes viewers on a journey through the mind of a man unraveling under the weight of guilt and obsession.

Set in a bleak and industrial landscape, “The Machinist” follows the story of Trevor Reznik, a factory worker who hasn’t slept in a year. Bale’s portrayal of Reznik is hauntingly visceral, as he transforms himself into a skeletal figure haunted by his own demons. As Reznik’s insomnia worsens, he begins to experience a series of bizarre and increasingly disturbing events that blur the line between reality and delusion.

One of the film’s most compelling aspects is its visual style, which mirrors Reznik’s fractured psyche. The desaturated color palette and stark cinematography create a sense of unease, while the film’s haunting score by Roque Baños adds to the atmosphere of dread and paranoia.

As Reznik’s world spirals out of control, he becomes increasingly obsessed with solving the mystery of a cryptic note left on his refrigerator and the enigmatic figure of Ivan, a co-worker who may hold the key to unlocking the secrets of his past. With each twist and turn, “The Machinist” keeps audiences guessing until its shocking and unforgettable conclusion.

But beyond its suspenseful plot and atmospheric visuals, “The Machinist” is ultimately a character study of a man on the brink of madness. Bale’s performance is nothing short of mesmerizing, as he captures the anguish and torment of a man grappling with guilt and self-destruction. Through Reznik’s journey, the film explores themes of isolation, redemption, and the nature of reality itself.

In the end, “The Machinist” is a haunting and unforgettable thriller that will leave you on the edge of your seat until the very end. So, prepare to be captivated by its psychological depth and unnerving atmosphere, and embark on a journey into the darkest recesses of the human mind.

Creep (2014)

Welcome to the twisted and unnerving world of “Creep,” a found-footage horror film that will keep you on the edge of your seat from start to finish. Directed by Patrick Brice and starring Mark Duplass, this chilling tale blurs the lines between reality and fiction, leaving viewers questioning what is truly lurking in the shadows.

In “Creep,” we follow the story of Aaron, a videographer who answers a Craigslist ad for a one-day filming job in a remote mountain town. Little does he know, his client, Josef, played by Duplass, is not what he seems. As the day progresses, Josef’s behavior becomes increasingly erratic and disturbing, leaving Aaron trapped in a nightmare from which he may never escape.

What sets “Creep” apart from other found-footage films is its masterful use of tension and suspense. Through cleverly crafted dialogue and subtle hints of menace, the film gradually builds an atmosphere of dread that keeps audiences guessing until the very end. As Josef’s true intentions become clear, viewers are left grappling with the unsettling realization that they may be witnessing the actions of a truly disturbed individual.

But it’s not just the psychological horror that makes “Creep” so compelling—it’s also the dynamic between its two central characters. Duplass delivers a tour-de-force performance as Josef, infusing the character with a mix of charm and menace that is equal parts captivating and terrifying. Meanwhile, Brice’s portrayal of Aaron adds an extra layer of vulnerability to the film as he grapples with the growing sense of unease that surrounds him.

As the tension mounts and the film hurtles towards its shocking conclusion, “Creep” delivers one spine-tingling moment after another, leaving audiences breathless and begging for more. Whether you’re a fan of found-footage horror or simply love a good scare, this is one film that is not to be missed.

So, prepare to be captivated by the chilling tale of “Creep” and embark on a journey into the darkest corners of human nature. Just remember, not everything is as it seems, and sometimes, the things that go bump in the night are far more terrifying than you could ever imagine.

The Taking of Deborah Logan (2014)

Prepare to be captivated by the unnerving and spine-tingling tale of “The Taking of Deborah Logan,” a found-footage horror film that defies expectations and pushes the boundaries of the genre. Directed by Adam Robitel, this chilling masterpiece takes viewers on a journey into the depths of madness and the supernatural, leaving them questioning the very nature of reality itself.

In “The Taking of Deborah Logan,” we are introduced to Mia, a graduate student who, along with her film crew, sets out to document the life of Deborah Logan, an elderly woman suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. As they delve deeper into Deborah’s life, however, they uncover a series of disturbing and inexplicable events that suggest something far more sinister may be at play.

What sets “The Taking of Deborah Logan” apart from other found-footage films is its unique blend of psychological horror and supernatural elements. As the film progresses, the line between Deborah’s illness and something more malevolent becomes increasingly blurred, leaving viewers on the edge of their seats as they try to unravel the mystery.

But it’s not just the story that makes “The Taking of Deborah Logan” so compelling—it’s also the remarkable performances of its cast. Jill Larson delivers a tour-de-force performance as Deborah, portraying the character with a mix of vulnerability and menace that is truly mesmerizing to watch. Meanwhile, the rest of the cast brings depth and nuance to their roles, adding an extra layer of realism to the film’s terrifying premise.

As the tension mounts and the truth about Deborah’s condition is slowly revealed, “The Taking of Deborah Logan” delivers one heart-stopping moment after another, leaving audiences breathless and on the edge of their seats until the very end. Whether you’re a fan of found-footage horror or simply love a good scare, this is one film that is not to be missed.

So, prepare to be enthralled by the dark and twisted tale of “The Taking of Deborah Logan,” and embark on a journey into the unknown where nothing is as it seems and the truth may be far more horrifying than you could ever imagine.

Midsommar (2019)

Get ready for a cinematic experience like no other with “Midsommar,” the mind-bending horror masterpiece from visionary director Ari Aster. Set against the backdrop of a remote Swedish village during its midsummer festival, this film delivers a chilling blend of folk horror, psychological terror, and stunning visual imagery that will leave you mesmerized from start to finish.

In “Midsommar,” we follow Dani, a young woman reeling from a recent tragedy, as she accompanies her boyfriend and his friends on a trip to the village to partake in the festival. What begins as a seemingly idyllic retreat soon takes a sinister turn as Dani and her companions become ensnared in the village’s dark rituals and traditions.

What sets “Midsommar” apart from other horror films is its emphasis on atmosphere and mood. From the moment the characters arrive in the village, Aster creates a sense of unease and dread that permeates every frame of the film. The lush, sun-drenched landscapes and colorful costumes stand in stark contrast to the horrors unfolding beneath the surface, creating a disorienting and unsettling experience for the viewer.

But it’s not just the visuals that make “Midsommar” so compelling—it’s also the complex characters and themes that Aster explores throughout the film. From Dani’s journey of self-discovery to the exploration of grief, trauma, and the dynamics of toxic relationships, “Midsommar” delves deep into the human psyche, challenging viewers to confront their own fears and anxieties.

The festival rituals themselves range from the bizarre to the downright horrifying. From the unsettling communal meals to the graphic displays of violence and sacrifice, “Midsommar” pulls no punches in its depiction of the village’s customs, immersing viewers in a world that is equal parts beautiful and terrifying.

As the film builds to its stunning climax, Aster masterfully ratchets up the tension, leaving audiences on the edge of their seats until the very end. Whether you’re a fan of horror or simply appreciate bold and thought-provoking cinema, “Midsommar” demands to be seen—and experienced—in all its twisted glory.

In summary, these parody film recommendations offer a delightful departure from the bone-chilling terror of “Hereditary,” providing a refreshing and comedic take on the horror genre. Embrace the absurdity and dive into a world where fright meets frivolity, where laughter reigns supreme amidst the darkness. So, grab your popcorn, dim the lights, and embark on a hilariously haunting journey through the twisted realm of parody horror. After all, sometimes the best way to face your fears is with a hearty dose of laughter.